Press

Below are select quotes from Richard’s directing career. If you have a directing inquiry, please use contact Richard using the form on the home page.

“Joseph” is a simple, basic musical with no life-changing messages. But Richard Sabellico, who helmed last season’s “Music Man,” kept you hanging on every scene, thanks to wacky, unexpected details. 

— Providence Journal

There may be trouble in River City, but the current run of “The Music Man” is about as trouble-free as you could ask, with ambitious choreography and Richard Sabellico’s tight direction, this Meredith Willson classic stays on track for close to three hours…  Sabellico and his cast turn the signature “Seventy-Six Trombones” into something of a showstopper.

— Providence Journal

Richard Sabellico’s expert direction and choreography, and the finesse of a finely chosen cast suggests that the show is a stop over on an extended tour or perhaps a new start up revival heading to Broadway.  Wrong!  Such is the ephemera of live theatre.

— Alvin Klein
New York Times

The framework of an entertaining evening is there, thanks to director Richard Sabellico.

— USA Today

Perhaps the greatest measure of Mr. Sabellico’s acumen is that even the “stock” characters seem inspired.

— The New Yorker

Richard Sabellico has staged a stylish, chamber proportioned revival. Colorful, tuneful, solid and interesting.

— Clive Barnes
New York Post

Richard Sabellico’s direction and staging is especially impressive.  A superb revival.  

— Howard Kissel
N.Y. Daily News

Richard Sabellico directs the show with affection for the characters and a keen eye for emotional conflicts that keep the story spinning.

— New York, New York

Directed and choreographed by Richard Sabellico this happy confection seems faster, funnier and fresher than it’s 1929 counterpart.

— Lawrence Van Gelder
New York Times

Director/choreographer Richard Sabellico has skillfully managed the recreation of the script’s comic set pieces and has oiled up the cracker romantic interludes so they actually take flight.  The evening contains many happy surprises and many sudden twists and turns.  A 1st class production all around.

— Variety

The Cocoanuts has been courageously and hilariously revived with resourceful direction and choreography by Richard Sabellico.

— Clive Barnes
The NY Post

One of the great things about this revival is the superb direction by Richard Sabellico.  The actors playing the Marx Brothers capture the loopy balletic style of the Marxes beautifully.

— Howard Kissel
NY Daily News

The songs are all superbly sung and more important, well acted.  The director is Richard Sabellico who assisted Arthur Laurents on the recent revival of “Gypsy”.  The Laurents concern for drama and character is highly evident in Mr. Sabellico’s expert work with his cast.

— Frank Rich
The New York Times

Richard Sabellico’s staging proves brisk, crisp and helpful in adding a cohesion and flow to the play that its first animators (Gene Saks, Ron Field) lacked.  If you are one of the happy few who did catch it on Broadway. You’ll see how it should have been done the first time around. 

— Clive Barnes
NY Post

Resourcefully directed by Richard Sabellico the production proceeds without a glitch.

— Mel Gussow
The New York Times

The show, conceived and directed by Richard Sabellico uses Bernstein’s tunes to paint a portrait of New York as a jostling arena for larger than life professional and romantic dreams.  All five of the astutely chosen cast members have voices that soar to semi-operatic heights.  The entire evening is infused with a ferocious power and energy.

— Stephen Holder
The New York Times

Under the direction of the shows creator, Richard Sabellico, the performances evoke a bracing mixture of aggressiveness and open hearted romanticism.  A+

— The NY Times Weekend section

Lessons in life, love, forgiveness, racial tolerance and global economics are derived with comic flair by an expert cast in the winning new revival of “A Majority of One”.  Under the direction of Richard Sabellico, the performances are deft and the proceedings savory making for an evening filled with considerable pleasures.

— Lawrence Van Gelder
The New York Times

Richard Sabellico’s direction is faultless. He keeps the play rooted in the motivations of its characters. What a pleasure to sit through an evening that displays so much craft, precision and harmonious ease.

— USA Today

Richard Sabellico, the director, and six actors of notable theatrical gifts have brought to life the considerable pain and power of this early Laurent’s work.  You leave grateful to have experienced some really fine acting while feeling as though you have been through a terrible battle.

— D.J.R. Bruckner
The New York Times

This edition of State Fair is a greatly improved production that has been given new life under the direction of Broadway genius, Richard Sabellico.  Sabellico has spiced it up with a new book and some new ideas.  His seamless staging moves the story along at a pace that is much more engaging than the 1996 Broadway revival.

The musical “Blood Brothers,” in itself, presents major problems but Richard Sabellico’s direction moves this darkening yet lively tale along at an irresistible pace.  Sabellico’s vivid production hits its best moments when Maureen Moore sings.  Roger Bart fills Mickey with vitality and humor as a boy before he falls into stoned pathos. Producer Hallinan has chosen an impressive team to make his theatre shine.

— Malcolm Johnson
The New York Times

In Richard Sabellico’s  simultaneously rustic and silken production, the characters wear, on their sleeves, hearts as ripe as the richest grapes and sing with robust voices.  The score, one of the musical theatres unsung treasure chests, ripples with pleasure but no more so than when hearing Patrick Wilson’s soaring baritone.  This Happy Fella is a production for the ages.

Revivals like “The Pajama Game” get by mainly on the strengths of its leading characters who here, do not disappoint.  But Sabellico has also gathered a first rate group of supporting players including Georgia Engel and Tony Award winner Jane Lanier.  Sabellico and his choreographer, Liza Gennaro, give a youthful ensemble plenty of fun to get into.  But the genius of this production comes right before the final curtain.  Sabellico had been given permission by Abbot’s widow Joy,  to save “There Once Was A Man” as the final duet between Beth Leavel and Robert Cuccioli.  And that’s when the lightning strikes. Fire works explode when these two pros let loose with a show stopping performance that brings the curtain down to a standing ovation.

The brightest sparkle in this delightful production is Victoria Clark as a near perfect Ella Peterson.  Couple that with Richard Sabellico’s exceptional ability to craft a script, the show makes for an evening filled with love and laughter.  … Andy Blankenbueller’s eclectic choreography pairs perfectly with Sabellico’s multifarious direction.